Qualifications and Awards

  • The apprenticeship program is designed to be 4 years long.
  • You are required to obtain 7200 hours of experience and attend school 3 times to complete the program.
  • The 7200 hours is made up of 5 categories. They are Forming, Framing, Interior Finishing, Exterior Finishing, and Scaffolding. Each has a minimum number of hours to complete. Some categories require more hours than others do. When these minimums are added up they equal 7200 hours. You cannot complete the apprenticeship unless you have met the minimum in each category. Usually this means you must quit a minimum of 4 secure jobs in order to gain the required experience. This is because most employers specialize in only one of these areas.
  • They expect you to work 1800 hours per year, however it isnít always possible due to economic and seasonal challenges.
  • You must quit your job once each year to go to school for 2 months.
  • Usually a replacement takes your place the day after you leave. This means you must find a new employer when you finish your term at school.
  • School gives you the technical knowledge required for each of the five categories.
  • School teaches you how to use technical data found in the National and Ontario building codes.
  • School also gives you an introduction to supplementary skills such as brazing and arc welding; computer drawing, spreadsheets, and word processors; blueprint reading; geometry; surveying; drywall and plastering; math, and English. You also learn how other trades like plumbing and electrical interact with carpentry.
  • Awards are no longer given to apprentices due to government cutbacks.
  • 40 students usually attend school each term.
  • In Ontario you can write for the provincial exam and the interprovicial exam.
  • You require an 80% pass mark on the provincial exam in order to qualify to write your interprovincial exam.
  • The interprovincial seal is recognized by all the provinces and allows the bearer to work equally anywhere in Canada. In practice, however, Quebec forces outsiders to write an additional exam in French to qualify to work there. I havenít attempted to certify in Quebec.
  • The interprovincial seal is generally the level of competence expected by countries around the world that are looking for employees from Canada.